What Is A CDD

A CDD is a local unit of special-purpose government governed by Chapter 190, Florida Statutes. Dupree Lakes CDD was established by Pasco County’s Ordinance 04-39 that was effective on September 8, 2004. The purpose of the CDD is to finance, fund, plan, design, establish, acquire, construct or reconstruct, enlarge or extend, equip, operate and maintain various public infrastructure improvements and community facilities that will benefit lands within the requested jurisdiction.

Who governs the CDD?

The CDD is governed by a five (5) member board of supervisors (the “Board”), the current Board is constituted on its entirety by elected Supervisors. They are elected during a general election of the registered voters within the District; much like a City Council Member or a County Commissioner. The Board of Supervisors each serves a 4-year term and is governed by the State of Florida and The Florida Sunshine Laws and Disclosures of an elected public official.

What benefits may CDD landowners expect to receive as a result of their investment?

CDD landowners may expect to receive three (3) major classes of benefits. First, the District provides landowners with consistently high levels of public facilities and services managed and financed through self-imposed fees and assessments. Second, the District ensures that these community development facilities and services will be completed concurrently with other portions of the development. Third, District landowners and, at a later date, qualified electors, choose the members of the Board and through these representatives are able to determine the type, quality and expense of District facilities and services.

What does my assessment cover?

Your annual assessment is derived into two parts; the Debt (the “Debt”) portion is the Series 2015A Bonds and the Operation and Maintenance (the “O&M”) portion that includes the General Fund from the Annual Adopted Budget:
The Debt is the fixed annual amount that needs to be collected to pay off the amount proportionately owed by each homeowner within the CDD in order to pay the issued bonds (loan) that paid for the CDD’s original infrastructure (roadway system, stormwater management system, sanitary sewer collections system, water distribution systems, parks and recreations facilities, and landscaping).
The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) portion applies to the general day-to-day administrative fees and costs as well as maintenance and repair of the infrastructure and general administrative functions (attorneys, engineers, board meetings, maintenance, landscape maintenance, lake maintenance, insurance, utilities, security services, etc.).
Insurance for the District, Audit expenses and various annual contracts are detailed in the CDD budget listed under Financials

Can I pay off the assessment?

Yes, the Debt Portion may be paid off in full. To request an estoppel letter with a payoff amount please contact Management at this link: Email CDD Management. Please take in consideration that paying off the Debt does not eliminate the O&M assessment that will continue to be levied on the property’s taxes for as long as the CDD exist. Additionally, a payoff transaction cannot be reversed.

How is the assessment collected?

Assessments are collected uniformly by the Pasco County Tax Collector as a “non-ad valorem” assessment on your Pasco County Tax bill and are paid directly by the owner or via a mortgage holder escrow, beginning November 1st of each year.

What is the difference between a CDD and my Homeowners Association (HOA)?

CDD’s are governmental in nature, functioning closer to a County. The specific scope of the services are prescribed in a creation ordinance from the Pasco County; delegating certain public functions to the CDD. CDD’s construct and manage utility and drainage (lakes) and collection systems, roads, landscape buffers, and in some cases security services. While the HOA is a private institution, HOA’s serve to benefit of the property owners and are self-governing, but are subject to limited collection and enforcement powers and duties outlined separately under state law. CDD’s also use the County Tax Collector for their assessments. CDD’s have limited liability under sovereign immunity, which significantly reduces insurance costs. It is the intent of the CDD to work with the HOA as close as possible to provide the best for the community and to reduce any potential duplication of efforts.